20 November 2017   |  Last Updated 14-11-2014 08:45

      Friday 14, November 2014

      BLOG: Amateur


      Isobel Hine
      from The Wednesday Players discusses 'Amateur' dramatics...


      Amateur: ‘A person who engages in an art, science, study, or athletic activity as a pastime rather than as a profession.’


      While looking through some definitions of ‘amateur’, one in particular grabbed my attention.


      ‘One lacking the skill of a professional, as in an art.’


      Although technically true (people who act for a profession have generally had more training etc), I still disagree with this for a number of reasons.


      Just because a person does not get paid to, for example, act, play an instrument or even play a sport, does this really mean they are not of a ‘professional’ standard? You could be an incredible pianist, playing at the standard of Mozart, but still only do it as a hobby. I admit, if you are that talented, usually you would turn it into a career eventually. However, there are still amateur performers out there who are of an outstanding professional level, and are happy to have this hobby on the side of their day to day job.


      In regards to amateur dramatics, it has been, and still is used as a derogatory term- describing a professional show as ‘a bit amateurish’.


      People who come to see a show performed by an amateur theatre group may have lower expectations compared to when they see a professional show, but I feel a lot of the time they are pleasantly surprised and impressed. I believe that in some cases, the standard of amateur theatre is exceptional.

      Amateur Theatre should be celebrated… (Via the Guardian)


      Having a hobby such as sailing, playing the guitar or singing can lead to incredible things. If you are taking part in school productions, or in your local amateur dramatics group, this could be the stepping stones to having a career you love in the future.


      Taking part in something you enjoy and do not want a career in is also beneficial. Being an amateur is NOTHING to be ashamed of. Embrace the fact that your skill is something you enjoy and something you can be exceedingly good at, even if you do not get paid to do it.

      By: Isobel Hine 

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