18 November 2017   |  Last Updated 18-12-2014 10:38

      Wednesday 10, December 2014

      LISTEN: North West Ambulance Service could see Christmas-call overload

      A team member from North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) responds to a callA team member from North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) responds to a call.


      NORTH West Ambulance Service (NWAS) are preparing for increased calls this Christmas time.

      With the demand in calls increasing since the 1st December, NWAS has seen a rise of around three hundred calls a day just in the Greater Manchester area.

      Martin Hawksworth, Duty Manager of the Emergency Operations Centre said: “A lot of it comes from an increase in population in the city from shoppers, as you can imagine a lot people, say from Derbyshire, come into the city to do Christmas shopping.

      "You also get a lot of Christmas parties, so a lot of people are drinking, even people who don’t go out all year and have a bottle of wine and then fall over in the street and injure themselves.”

      The Ambulance Service, based in Greater Manchester covers a population of over seven million people with over 5,100 staff.

      NWAS are using the hashtag #BeforeYouCall to make people think before calling 999 whether their circumstance is an emergency or life threatening.




      Martin Hawksworth is the Deputy Manager of the Emergency Operations Centre based in Hulme, Greater ManchesterMartin Hawksworth is the Deputy Manager of the Emergency Operations Centre based in Hulme, Greater Manchester


      Mr Hawksworth said: “There are people that are calling us that really need our help and might be really poorly but because there are so many other people calling, we have to try and sift those people out to get them an ambulance and the help they really need.

      "When you are calling, think about what you are calling for. If you cannot deal with that situation in half an hour or an hours’ time then it is probably going to be an emergency, i.e. someone who is unconscious or even drank too much but can’t manage their own airway.

      "If it is an immediate threat to life then call us, but if not think about your walk-in centres or GP’s, and it might be that they can give more appropriate treatment," said Mr Hawksworth.

      "Just because we get there quickly doesn’t mean we can give the best treatment either, as we are more geared up for circumstances that threaten lives.”



      By India Greenhalgh

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